Thursday, August 2, 2012

HOW CHINA WINS AT THE OLYMPICS

KEE@FSWMAG.COM

ATHLETES FROM CHINA TENDS TO WIN GOLD AND WHY NOT? AFTER YEARS IF NOT A DECADE OF STRENUOUS TRAINING, THEY DESERVE IT!


It makes me proud to be a Chinese to know my fellow race is working and striving and slaving so hard to win gold at the Olympics! 


Of course sour grapes will mock and say winning is not everything---if so, why bother taking part in the first place? Why not stay home and watch blue movies and wank?


Seems like a waste of time to participate with no intention of winning...legally of course. Those who decry China's victories and medal after medal of gold are plain JEALOUS! 


The whites are grinding their teeth to smithereens as for the last 2,000 years, they have been the dominant race but now the Chinese is the superior race! So the whites are turning green as the yellows refuse to mellow but go all out....not only for gold in the  Olympics but in everything else! 


China never does things by half. So when their Olympians go to London, it is with every expectation they should win and win BIG. This is how they do it.


Look, learn and despair....sounds like something Sauron and Saruman would say in Lord of the Rings





Torture or training?

Inside the brutal Chinese gymnasium where the country's future Olympic stars are beaten into shape

By Matt Blake
PUBLISHED: 14:44 GMT, 1 August 2012 | UPDATED: 16:41 GMT, 1 August 2012
  •  
Her face etched with pain, a child trains for Olympic glory while her gymnastics trainer stands on her legs.

The cartoon space rockets and animal astronauts on her tiny red leotard are a stark and powerful reminder of this little girl's tender age as she trains as hard as any adult athlete in the Western world.

Nanning Gymnasium in Nanning, China, is one of many ruthless training camps across the country to which parents send their children to learn how to be champions.
Hard training: Her face etched with pain, a child trains for Olympic glory while her gymnastics trainer stands on her legs.
Hard training: Her face etched with pain, a child trains for Olympic glory while her gymnastics trainer stands on her legs.

But while training techniques appear extreme to Western eyes, they provide an insight into why China's athletes at London 2012 seem so easily able to swim, dive, lift and shoot their way to victory.

Gymnastic stars are known for starting at an incredibly early age, and this group of children appear no different as they battled to complete the demanding routines on bars, rings, and mats.


Boys and girls who looked no older than five or six-years-old were tasked with swinging on beams, hanging from pairs of rings and bounding across floor mats during the physically strenuous training sessions.
Ruthless: Boys and girls who looked no older than five or six-years-old were tasked with swinging on beams, hanging from pairs of rings and bounding across floor mats during the physically strenuous training sessions
Ruthless: Boys and girls who looked no older than five or six-years-old were tasked with swinging on beams, hanging from pairs of rings and bounding across floor mats during the physically strenuous training sessions

Growing strong: Nanning Gymnasium in Nanning, China, is one of many ruthless training camps across the country to which parents send their children to learn how to be champions
Growing strong: Nanning Gymnasium in Nanning, China, is one of many ruthless training camps across the country to which parents send their children to learn how to be champions
Ruthless: Nanning Gymnasium in Nanning, China, is one of many ruthless training camps across the country to which parents send their children to learn how to be champions
Gymnastic stars are known for starting at an incredibly early age, and this group of children appear no different as they battled to complete the demanding routines on bars, rings, and mats.
Going for gold: While training techniques appear extreme to Western eyes, they provide an insight into why China's athletes at London 2012 seem so easily able to swim, dive, lift and shoot their way to victory

Stretchy: Gymnastic stars are known for starting at an incredibly early age, and this group of children appear no different as they battled to complete the demanding routines on bars, rings, and mats
Stretchy: Gymnastic stars are known for starting at an incredibly early age, and this group of children appear no different as they battled to complete the demanding routines on bars, rings, and mats


The youngsters at the same training school will be hoping to emulate the success of 16-year-old swimming sensation Ye Shewin, who glided into the record books on Saturday night.

Only last January harrowing photographs were posted on the internet showing Chinese children crying in pain as they were put to work.
In case they had forgotten why they were there, a large sign on the wall reminded them. ‘GOLD’ it said simply.

Charges are often taught by rote that their mission in life is to beat the Americans and all-comers to the top of the podium.
24/7 routine: A child stretches at home during a gymnastics training session in Nanning, China
24/7 routine: A child stretches at home during a gymnastics training session in Nanning, China
 A child stretches during a gymnastics training session at Nanning Gymnasium in Nanning, China.
 A child stretches during a gymnastics training session at Nanning Gymnasium in Nanning, China.
To the top: Charges are often taught by rote that their mission in life is to beat the Americans and all-comers to the top of the podium

No nonsense: The trainers are tough on the children who go through rigorous training schedules

No nonsense: The trainers are tough on the children who go through rigorous training schedules

Home time: Children wait for their parents after completing a gymnastics training session in Nanning
Home time: Children wait for their parents after completing a gymnastics training session in Nanning

Ye Shiwen astounded the swimming world by knocking more than a second off the world record for the 400m individual medley
Ye Shiwen astounded the swimming world by knocking more than a second off the world record for the 400m individual medley

Winner: Miss Ye poses with her gold medal on the podium. Ye insists that her 'results come from hard work and training'
Mission accomplished: Miss Ye poses with her gold medal on the podium. Ye insists that her 'results come from hard work and training'
Winning at all costs: Children are put through their paces doing punishing exercises to toughen them up
Winning at all costs: Children are put through their paces doing punishing exercises to toughen them up
Children are trained at camps where the word 'gold' is hung on the wall to make them focus on success
Children are trained at camps where the word 'gold' is hung on the wall to make them focus on success
Young boys and girls are put through their paces at the Chen Jinglun Sports School, the alma mater of Ye Shiwen
Young boys and girls are put through their paces at the Chen Jinglun Sports School, the alma mater of Ye Shiwen

The school also trained Sun Yang, who won the 400m freestyle at London 2012
The school also trained Sun Yang, who won the 400m freestyle at London 2012
Ye¿s team-mate, 23-year-old Lu Ying, this week attacked China¿s grindingly repetitive coaching regime
Ye's team-mate, 23-year-old Lu Ying, this week attacked China's grindingly repetitive coaching regime
A group of young boys await their turn in the pool
A group of young boys await their turn in the pool







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Just how far the Chinese go to win gold: Parents reveal devastating family secret they kept for a year so diving star daughter wasn't distracted from Olympic event

By Leon Watson
PUBLISHED: 01:18 GMT, 2 August 2012 | UPDATED: 01:33 GMT, 2 August 2012
  •  
Winning an Olympic gold should be a moment of great joy for any athlete at London 2012.
But for Chinese diver Wu Minxia securing her golden hat-trick on Sunday at the Aquatic Centre in east London was followed by shock and sadness.


Straight after a triumph in the women's Synchronised 3m Springboard that made her a legend in her sport, the 26-year-old's family decided it was the right time to tell her a devastating family secret.


Tinged with sadness: Minxia Wu of China celebrates her gold medal in women's Synchronised 3m Springboard. She was then told the devastating secret
Tinged with sadness: Minxia Wu of China celebrates her gold medal in women's Synchronised 3m Springboard. She was then told the devastating secret


They admitted to their daughter that her grandparents died - over a year ago. And instead of telling her, they kept it back.
Wu's family also revealed that her mother had been battling breast cancer for several years, something Wu had no idea about.


The reasoning was clear: they wanted her to win at all costs and didn't want family matters to interfere with her diving career.


Wu, who with teammate He Zi won the last two synchronised gold medals in Athens and Beijing, was an overwhelming favourite to win gold again and successfully lead China's quest to unite every Olympic and world diving gold medal.


She was under intense pressure to succeed - and so were her family.
Father Wu Yuming said: 'It was essential to tell this white lie.'

Wu Minxia of China, left, was told her mother had been battling breast cancer for several years, something she had no idea about

Wu Minxia of China, left, was told her mother had been battling breast cancer for several years, something she had no idea about

China's Wu Minxia and He Zi dive during the springboard diving event at the London 2012 Olympic Games

China's Wu Minxia and He Zi dive during the springboard diving event at the London 2012 Olympic Games

Wu began diving training at the age of six, and left home at 16, bound for a government aquatic training institute.


She is one of her sport's brightest stars, and part of that is thanks to the price paid by her personal life.


'We accepted a long time ago that she doesn't belong entirely to us,' Wu Yuming told the Shanghai Morning Post.


'I don't even dare to think about things like enjoying family happiness.'


Wu's mother defended her decision by saying she decided to wait until her breast cancer was in remission before breaking the news to her daughter of her condition.
The admission has sparked a debate in China over the country's win-at-all-costs mentality when it comes to the Olympics.


The pursuit of success has been publicly chased by the government-backed sports national sports program with unshakeable zeal over the past two decades.

In a country where messages of congratulations from the government to athletes through the state news agency are only sent to gold medalists, not those winning silver or bronze, there now there seems to be a backlash against this mentality.

After the revelations about Wu followed fierce criticism from a national newspaper when a 17-year-old weightlifter failed to medal.

3 comments:

MYI said...

hahaha, i guess, ppl were trained to win at d olympics at watching blue and wank events...lol!

new fart said...

Well said Kee! Whenever an Asian, especially Mainland Chinese, dominates in a sport that's traditionally dominated by the whites, they cry foul and accuse others of cheating. To me these white trash just can't seem to understand what losing is about. The Yanks and the Poms are the worst and the white Aussies are no better! All you have to do is just to hear their commentaries on the telecast. They are but just sore losers!

Ajey said...

This pain is not worth for the gold. Very bad on small kids!!.